Category Archives: Cooking Method

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Fish Curry

Fish curry is a common dish in Singapore and Malaysia. Often cooked with the fish head or fish meat, the
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Three Cups Chicken

This must the most common dish in any Chinese family across the globe. The three main ingredients in any Chinese
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Beef Rendang

Print Yum Beef Rendang Ingredients500g beef cheeks cut into cubes 5 tablespoons cooking oil 1 big onion sliced 1 thumb
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Mrs Lim’s Fried Chicken

Every single culture has got fried chicken. There are so many versions, it is mind-boggling. I make fried chicken so
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Braised Meat, Tofu or Eggs

Every Southeast Asian and Chinese family has a version of this. This is our comfort food, and it does not
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Kambing Soup

This is a dish every Singaporean is familiar with, and it is often sold by Indian muslims. It fully utilizes
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Goat Curry

This is my own version of the goat curry. Therefore, it is ‘Singaporean-ized’. It is simple, and as my family
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Gourmet Shepherd’s Pie

My kids grew up eating this pie, as it is very suitable for little children. Whenever I wanted them to
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Red Wine Beef Stew

Stews are really important for mothers. From the East to the West, mothers make stews: chicken, lamb, beef, veggies, tofu
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Nasi Bryani

Nasi bryani is such a common dish in Singapore, and every single Indian store I know sells it. It is
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Char Kway Teow (炒果条)

Together with oyster omelette, char kway teow reminds me of the street operas in Singapore. 做大戏。I am not a fan
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Chicken Dumpling (鸡肉包)

We eat these on a daily basis in Singapore. It is sold literally everywhere. When I was teaching in SMU,
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Singapore Curry Chicken

This is so often cooked in our house, I don’t even think we need to have a recipe. But I’d
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Mum’s Nasi Lemak

Nasi is rice in Malay, while lemak means fat, though when we say lemak, it often refers to coconut milk
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Ayam Buah Keluak

I have postponed documenting this, simply because it is a long process and takes a while to recall the steps
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Steam Stuff Sotong

Not sure of the origin of this dish. Every culture and cuisine seems to have a version of the stuffed
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Ayam Pedas Ikan

Every Singaporean family has a version of this dish, too, and it does not matter if you are Chinese, Malay
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Big Pork Dumpling (大包)

Steamed yeast buns has always been my nemesis. It looks so deceptively simple yet, I find it harder than any
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Chap Chye

This is another peranakan dish that is eaten in every family whether or not we are peranakan.  Print Yum Chap
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Itek Tim (咸菜鸭)

Kiam Chye Ark is what we call this dish in our house, and we have been eating this since we
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Soon Kueh (笋粿)

My earliest memory of Soon kueh is my mother kneading the dough inside a red plastic container. I remember putting
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Singaporean Rojak

My first memories of rojak was this hawker who would peddle to our neighbourhood and sound his horn to let
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Fish Asam Pedas Curry

Fish curry is something all Singaporeans grow up eating. There’s always lady’s finger (okra) and tomatoes in them. Infused with
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Otah

Yes, we all grow up with these. For beginners, we train our palette eating the white, non-spicy versions and then
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Mee Siam

I am not sure why we call this Mee Siam, as if it originates from Siam or Thailand. I have
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Char Siew Sou (叉烧酥)

Making Char Siew Sou has always been a 'big affair'. In fact, making any kind of puff pastry is too
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Popiah (薄饼)

This is a common street or hawker food in Singapore, which is primarily vegetables. My mum would tell me how
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Sang Choy Bao (生菜包)

When I was little, my mum would make fried rice and then cut some ice berg lettuce. We love Sang
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Honey-soy Chicken

In an ang mo (western) country, honey-soy seems to be an Asian or Oriental kind of dish. Funny thing is
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Papaya Milk (木瓜牛奶)

I remember this drink started to appear in the hawker centers in the 1980s. Prior to that the fruit stalls
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Muah Chee (麻糍)

These days, some western desserts call for candied bacon. While many find it refreshing and innovative, I wonder if people
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Lapis Surabaya Wannabe

This is a wannabe because it only looks like a lapis surabaya. This traditional cake originally asks for 30 egg
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Pig Maw Soup (猪肚汤)

Probably one of the easiest soup to make. When I first got married, this is the soup that I will
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Plain Porridge (白粥)

I like the Amoy Street stall the most when it comes to 鱼生粥 with a plate of 鱼生. I've tried
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Satay

One of the three opened jars of peanut butter in the pantry tastes blend. I have to find a way
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Baked Salmon in Curry

My baked salmon in 8 minutes, seasoned in green curry paste and baked in a thick coconut creme.Not feeling very
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Duck Confit Wannabe

Duck confit wannabe with sweet potatoes and potatoes cooked in duck fat. Of course it is a wannabe. I will
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Raw Fish Salad(鱼生)

I like the Amoy Street stall the most when it comes to 鱼生粥 with a plate of 鱼生. I've tried
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Curry Puffs

My father was a pastry chef. My mother told me a story of how he was asked to conduct a
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Ondeh Ondeh

I learned to make Ondeh Ondeh when I was 13 years old, in my Secondary 1 Home Economics class when
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SwordFish Chowder

SwordFish is best uncooked, because once it is cooked, it is tough and rough for the Asian palette. So here’s
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Pandan Chiffon Cake

Every Singaporean child grows up with Pandan Chiffon cakes.  To my kids and I, it has to be warm and