Category Archives: Food Type

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Daniel’s Swordfish Pie

After shooting one of our classes a few weeks ago, Nick (my business partner) told me that our cameraman, Daniel,
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Fish Curry

Fish curry is a common dish in Singapore and Malaysia. Often cooked with the fish head or fish meat, the
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Japanese-Singaporean Soba

I have made chashu (チャーシュー) the way most Japanese ladies make them quite often as the kids love it. I
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Savoury Muffins

A bit lazy to make bread, crusts for quiches are too troublesome. Don’t want to make any pastry, too much
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Ramen

Cook everything from scratch! It tastes wonderful and you don’t have to guess what goes into anything! This is a
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Simple Ramen

My daughter and husband love ramen and we go out to eat ramen too often. My I have a dental
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Raita

This is so simple and so delicious. It is also healthy. I made this dish to go with any curry,
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Nasi Bryani

Nasi bryani is such a common dish in Singapore, and every single Indian store I know sells it. It is
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Thai Anchovy and Nut Snack

I am not sure when this started to hit the supermarket shelves in Singapore and even in western countries. Probably
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Char Kway Teow (炒果条)

Together with oyster omelette, char kway teow reminds me of the street operas in Singapore. 做大戏。I am not a fan
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Sushi

Making sushi is actually not very difficult. I have been making with my mother for quite some time. But I
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Tempura Ramen

In making tempura, for me, it is like having a chemistry reaction. You drop the meat/veggies inside and it goes
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Quiche Lorraine

I used to love to make these as a teenager. They taste wonderful to me. Imagine the glee when Delifrance
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Mum’s Nasi Lemak

Nasi is rice in Malay, while lemak means fat, though when we say lemak, it often refers to coconut milk
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Steam Stuff Sotong

Not sure of the origin of this dish. Every culture and cuisine seems to have a version of the stuffed
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Ayam Pedas Ikan

Every Singaporean family has a version of this dish, too, and it does not matter if you are Chinese, Malay
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Sayur Lodeh – Vegetable Curry

Simple Indonesian vegetable curry. Staple of most South East Asians. Added some prawns for extra taste. Print Yum Sayur Lodeh
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Begedil (Fried Potato Cutlet)

Is it perkedel or begedil? My hubby asked. These are both. The Indonesians call this perkedel but the Javanese call
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Tahu Telur (Bean Curd Omelette)

I have never understood nor appreciated my mother’s style of cooking. I couldn’t figure why, when everybody’s curry was watery
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Big Pork Dumpling (大包)

Steamed yeast buns has always been my nemesis. It looks so deceptively simple yet, I find it harder than any
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Pepper Crab

Singaporeans are crab lovers and crab is in season 365 days a year. Why wouldn’t it be, when you simply
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Chap Chye

This is another peranakan dish that is eaten in every family whether or not we are peranakan.  Print Yum Chap
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Bean Curd (豆花)

This is a staple breakfast for Singaporeans. In the mornings, the soya bean hawkers will boil their soya bean milk
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Lor Mai Gai (糯米鸡)

These days, when I searched around for this steamed glutinuous rice chicken dish, all of them look so different from
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Singaporean Rojak

My first memories of rojak was this hawker who would peddle to our neighbourhood and sound his horn to let
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Fish Asam Pedas Curry

Fish curry is something all Singaporeans grow up eating. There’s always lady’s finger (okra) and tomatoes in them. Infused with
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Otah

Yes, we all grow up with these. For beginners, we train our palette eating the white, non-spicy versions and then
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Mee Siam

I am not sure why we call this Mee Siam, as if it originates from Siam or Thailand. I have
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Popiah (薄饼)

This is a common street or hawker food in Singapore, which is primarily vegetables. My mum would tell me how
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Sang Choy Bao (生菜包)

When I was little, my mum would make fried rice and then cut some ice berg lettuce. We love Sang
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Plain Porridge (白粥)

I like the Amoy Street stall the most when it comes to 鱼生粥 with a plate of 鱼生. I've tried
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Dan Dan Noodles (担担面)

If you have only eight minutes to cook, don't reach out for that instant noodles. Try cooking this instead. It
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Baked Salmon in Curry

My baked salmon in 8 minutes, seasoned in green curry paste and baked in a thick coconut creme.Not feeling very
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Cabbage and Bacon Soup

Vegetable soups are often a good complement to meaty dishes. I am left with only cabbage in the house as
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Raw Fish Salad(鱼生)

I like the Amoy Street stall the most when it comes to 鱼生粥 with a plate of 鱼生. I've tried
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SwordFish Chowder

SwordFish is best uncooked, because once it is cooked, it is tough and rough for the Asian palette. So here’s